• Distance Education: How Does it Work?

    Distance Education: How Does it Work?

    Have you ever heard about distance studies? Did this new form of education spark your interest? I have been studying online for the past two and a half years, let me tell you all about it!   How it works   Studying online is as simple as the name: you literally study, but do everything online. The way it works with Laurentian is quite simple: you register for certain courses, log-in to the online studies platform, find the syllabus as well as the required textbooks and coursepacks needed for the course, and are set to go.   Every course is different. In some, you will have only quizzes and a few online discussions, whereas other courses require weekly assignments. For my “Feminist Theories” class, for example, I had weekly worksheets to hand in, which each required a good 4 to 5 hours of work. Meanwhile, my “Explanations of Crime” class requires only 2 discussions and 2 assignments. Nevertheless, the fewer…

  • Opportunities: Know When to Take Them

    Opportunities: Know When to Take Them

    In October 2018, while studying in my favourite café in Rabat, I met someone I didn’t know would open up new doors for me. As I was working on some sociology-related project, a nice woman called Sarah spoke to me and asked about what I was doing. We talked about my studies, the fact that we both come from Québec (well, she is Moroccan and Canadian,– it’s a complicated story), and she told me about this foundation she works for. She shared that the foundation is always looking for interns, and we exchanged contact details.   A year later, while the London drama was happening, I realised that I would be moving back to Germany soon and would have to figure out what in the world I want to do this year. I think about Sarah, her proposition regarding interning at the foundation and decide to give it a try.   Although at the time I hadn’t really thought much of…

  • I'm back in Morocco!

    I’m back in Morocco!

    The first time I came to Morocco, I was shocked to see something drastically different from anything I had ever seen before. From living with a host family for the first time to encountering women that had had very poor access to education, it was a reality check– I am very privileged. I realised, for the first time in my life, that some of the problems I saw as humongous in my life are really quite trivial in comparison to those faced by the women I taught every day. I was nervous and worried to walk through Rabat because of the incessant street harassment and didn’t know how to deal with it.   Coming back to Rabat in 2019, now being 20 years old and having seen quite a bit more of the world, I see this city from a whole new perspective. I was happy to see my host family again and found ways to feel more comfortable on…